HomeAbout UsRooms and RatesContact UsMap/DirectionsLinksActivities in our AreaSt Marys RiverNorth Star Rails to TrailsTestimonialsHistorical InformationLocal WeatherAvailability
Historical Information

Our BnB is situated on the land once occupied by the Otis Staples Saw Mill .  We have a variety of historical pictures of the Wycliffe Sawmill in our B and B for your viewing pleasure.

Design/005.JPG

The Staples Lumber Company of Wycliffe B.C. was foremost among the sawmills of the East Kootenays between 1887 and 1927.  The sawmill was built on the banks of the St Marys River at Wycliffe.  "It was one of the largest railway logging operations in this area.  With headquarters in Wycliffe, the Otis Staples Lumber Company ran spurs over much of the territory on both sides of the Kootenay River." (filesfortsteele.ca/history) 
 

Design/004.JPG
Design/004.JPG

Logging methods were suited to the forests of the East Kootenays.  Initially, horses pulled logs efficiently.  There could also be work in the winter as logs were pulled by horse and sleigh.  The logging railway was introduced to haul logs over longer distances.  Eventually, a total of 25 miles (40km) of track were in operation by 6 logging railway companies.
The track at Wycliffe was built as narrow guage operations meaning that the distance between the rails was approximately 3 feet (.91m) to 3 feet 6 inches (1.07m).   (www.crowsnest.bc.ca/logging)

Design/002.JPG

The development of the sawmill meant the growth of a town.  There was a school for the children, churches, hotels, a dance hall and homes for workers and their families.  Quite well known were also the post office , liveries, butcher shops and bakeries.  All was not work however as the locals assembled baseball and hockey teams which faired well in local competitions.

Design/history.JPG

There are remnants of the old sawmill still to be seen at Wycliffe but all are on private properties.  Residents of the area are encouraged to preserve remaining sections of the sawmill.

Enter supporting content here